Well being ministers agree on bettering well being care, however premiers holding out: Duclos

OTTAWA — Well being Minister Jean-Yves Duclos and his provincial counterparts agreed privately on what must be executed to enhance well being care, the federal minister mentioned Wednesday, however he argued “the ball is within the premiers’ court docket” to just accept a deal for mo

OTTAWA — Well being Minister Jean-Yves Duclos and his provincial counterparts agreed privately on what must be executed to enhance well being care, the federal minister mentioned Wednesday, however he argued “the ball is within the premiers’ court docket” to just accept a deal for extra funding from Ottawa.

Talks between federal and provincial politicians have stalled towards a backdrop of overwhelmed pediatric hospitals and health-worker burnout that has plunged Canada’s system right into a disaster.

Provinces and territories have demanded a rise to the Canada Well being Switch, which is the primary supply of federal funds that movement into provincial well being techniques, however the prime minister says that may occur provided that the provinces comply with reform and enhance these techniques.

Duclos met with provincial and territorial well being ministers final month in British Columbia, and he says they achieved consensus about what must be executed, however premiers have refused to log out.

“We agreed on all the issues and the options to these issues. We had been in complete settlement in Vancouver in non-public,” Duclos advised reporters Wednesday.

“The issue is that premiers don’t need us to talk of these outcomes and people outcomes. They need to keep a futile combat on {dollars}.”

Manitoba Premier Heather Stefanson mentioned Wednesday the federal minister’s feedback had been “inaccurate.”

“The Canada Well being Switch wasn’t even on the agenda when well being ministers met final month. He gave media sound bites outdoors the assembly, however got here with no precise proposals of any variety. These are the info,” Stefanson mentioned in an emailed assertion .

She mentioned Canadians had been uninterested in “federal video games” and repeated the premiers’ request for a gathering with the prime minister.

Provincial premiers say they can not agree on a deal till they sit down as a bunch with Justin Trudeau. The prime minister is not going to decide to such a gathering, preferring as an alternative to speak with premiers one-on-one.

“We welcome additional particulars of a federal proposal to anchor and advance substantive dialogue and significant progress,” the premiers wrote in a joint letter to the prime minister as a part of a gathering request.

Trudeau reiterated his stance on the negotiations and well being care on the whole Wednesday on his method into the ultimate Home of Commons query interval earlier than the vacation break.

“We’re all apprehensive in regards to the state of well being care on this nation … and that is why I will proceed to push on provinces to ship actual outcomes for Canadians,” Trudeau mentioned.

“We’ll be there with investments, however we have to make it possible for they’re serving to Canadians get household medical doctors, find yourself off wait lists and into therapy.”

Nonetheless issues bought so far, they’re now in a stalemate, mentioned Steven Staples, nationwide director of coverage and advocacy on the Canadian Well being Coalition.

“Persons are in search of federal management now to interrupt the deadlock,” Staples mentioned in an interview Wednesday.

He advised it is perhaps time for the prime minister to ship his message to the premiers in particular person at a sit-down assembly to get the negotiations transferring, however Duclos mentioned he’s positive the well being ministers will be capable of attain an settlement — if the premiers permit it.

“We all know we’ll get to an settlement on outcomes in some unspecified time in the future,” Duclos mentioned. “We want premieres to allow us to try this work.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first printed Dec. 14, 2022.

Laura Osman, The Canadian Press

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